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What Are the Most Efficient Commercial Air Handler Options?

Choosing the right commercial air handler can make your business more comfortable, efficient and save you money. This device provides a key element of the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system.

What is an air handler?
Air handlers, also referred to as air handling units (AHUs), circulate and regulate the air from an HVAC unit. The AHU forms the backbone of the HVAC system. Its large metal housing contains the blower, cooling and heating elements, fan, its filter chambers or racks, dampers and sound attenuators. It filters and circulates air throughout the building’s duct system.

Efficient Air Handlers

You’ll find three main types of commercial HVAC systems with air handlers. Depending on the size of your building, the following might be right for your needs:

  • single split system,
  • multi-split system,
  • VRF or VRV system.

Single Split System

A single split system provides an affordable system for small commercial buildings. It lets your heating and cooling individual areas or rooms. This makes it a typical solution for cafes, server rooms, small offices, and shops. While you can combine them since you need one outdoor unit for each indoor unit, it adds to the cost and you need space outdoors too for each unit. This can detract from the landscape.

The advantages of more than one single split though are its cheaper than a central system and since each self-contained unit ensures you still have HVAC if one unit breaks down.

Multi-Split System

A multi-split system functions similar to a single split with one key difference – some systems let you connect up to nine indoor units per outdoor unit. These prove popular with doctor’s offices, restaurants, shops, and large offices.

This choice lets you preserve the aesthetic of your building’s exterior while efficiently cooling and heating the interior. You can use more than one type of interior unit and you can combine wall- and ceiling-mounted air conditioning units. Their complexity does require more pipework than using several single splits which drives the cost up.

VRF or VRV

The two acronyms refer to the same technology. Variable refrigerant flow (VRF) and variable refrigerant volume (VRV) share the same meaning. The VRF/VRV option provides the most efficient solution for medium to large structures such as hotels, mixed-use buildings, large offices and retail spaces.

These systems provide reliability and simple controls with shorter installation times. Two types exist: heat pump and heat recovery. The heat pump option works better in open plan areas to provide either cooling or heating to the structure. Heat recovery options let different areas of the building use heating and cooling simultaneously. This makes them ideal for large office buildings with many individual offices. These recovery systems provide the greatest efficiency since they recover waste heat and use it to heat both hot water and other rooms.

Contact O.C. McDonald today at 408-295-2182 to learn how we can help you choose the most efficient commercial air handler for your business. Ask us how a system with direct-drive fans, fan arrays, and energy recovery systems can help create further efficiency in your building.

Can Air handlers Commercial help Ventilate My Office?

Most of the commercial buildings are incredibly complex. Right from the foundation where they sit to the roof up above, every element in a commercial building is designed to meet specific requirements. Every commercial building must be robust and be able to protect the equipment and those who reside in it. Above all, these structures must be able to offer comfort to the people inside them.

One of the ways to guaranteeing the comfort of people working in offices and commercial facilities is by ensuring there is a continuous supply of clean air and that the indoor temperatures are regulated. And this is where commercial air handling units come in. An air handling unit refers to a piece of equipment or tools that help to keep the indoor environment safe and comfortable for people.

Regulating indoor temperatures

Heating and cooling are one of the main functions of a commercial air handling unit. Working in uncontrolled temperatures does not only affect the performance of workers, but it can also take a toll on their health. Some illnesses, such as common cold incubate in low temperatures.

Air filtration

Besides regulating indoor temperatures, it is also essential to consider the cleanliness of the air circulating in your workplaces. Some offices are situated in places where there are high rates of air pollution. If people working in these places are exposed to air contaminants for a long time, it can lead to long-term health complications.

Also, the presence of contaminants in the air may trigger allergies, respiratory, immune disorders, and asthma attacks in some people. A commercial air handling unit has filters that help remove dust, gases, pollen, molds, and other contaminants in the air. Some industrial air handlers come with oxidizers that remove certain gases from ventilation air.

Humidity and moisture control

If left uncontrolled, humidity, and moisture in office spaces can damage the building structure. Unchecked moisture can also destroy office furniture, documents, and even office equipment. Excess moisture and humidity in indoor office spaces also promote the growth of molds. These can cause serious health problems to the office occupants.

Sometimes, the indoor air can become too dry, even when the outdoor air is relatively humid. It can cause also cause discomfort and various health problems. A commercial air handler has a component that helps to regulate the amount of moisture inside a building.

Monitoring and controlling air volume

Besides regulating the quality of indoor air, it is also essential to ensure that acceptable quantities of air are supplied to the indoor spaces. The amount of air circulating in occupied areas may affect its quality. A commercial air handler has components that regulate the volume of air circulating indoors.

If you need help with your office air ventilation, feel free to contacts us at 408-295-2182 to enquire about our commercial air handling units. Our highly experienced specialists can take care of any project, regardless of its size. We pride in being trustworthy and offering excellent services to our customers.

How Long Does It Take to Install a Commercial Air Handler System?

Installation of air conditioning units in commercial facilities has become a standard practice for modern developments. The demand for conditioned air in office and business premises continue to grow every year, and here are some of the reasons.

Nowadays, when a customer enters into an office or business premises, they expect to be in a cool and pleasant environment. Presence of fresh and regulated temperatures creates an ideal environment for people to spend more time. If customers spend more time in your restaurant or café, they are definitely going to spend more money, which is an advantage to the proprietor.

In-office settings, employees are more productive when they work in a conditioned environment. In a school setting, students are likely to perform better when they study and take their exams in a comfortable environment. Commercial air handlers do guarantee not only the comfort of the people residing in business places but also their health. The filters in an industrial air handling unit help to remove contaminants that cause various health problems.

Installing commercial air handlers

If you are planning to install an industrial air handling unit in your facility, you have many options to choose from. However, you will have some work to do unless you have a trusted specialist to consult. To start with, you will need to carry out a thorough assessment of your premises to determine the size of the air handling unit required to cater for ventilation needs in your premises. Once the evaluation has been completed, a commercial air handling unit specialist will help you to choose the right equipment for your commercial facility.

How long does the installation take?

This is a commonly asked question by many people who want to install a commercial air handling unit for the first time. To be honest, there is no definite answer to how soon the technicians can complete the project of installing a commercial air handling unit. The time taken to install this unit depends on several factors.

The size of your commercial facility

Do you want to install a conditioning unit in a 5000 sq./ft or a 10,000sq/ft commercial facility? The project can be completed in one day if it is in a small facility and without any complications. However, the project can run for a few days or even weeks in more extensive commercial facilities.

Is it a changeout of full system replacement?

We have two types of commercial air handling installations: a full system replacement and a changeout. A changeout refers to when specific components of the air conditioning unit are replaced while the rest of the system remains intact. Again, it can take a day to do replacements while it takes a few days to replace the entire system, including the ductwork.

There are a host of factors that determines how long it takes to install a commercial air handling unit. Hopefully, this article answers your questions. However, if you need more answers about the installation of commercial air handling units, don’t hesitate to contact us at 408-295-2182.

How often will I need to replace my commercial air handlers?

An industrial facility is full of people and equipment that generate much heat, making it uncomfortable to work in the interior spaces. During such times, a commercial air handling unit comes in handy as it plays a crucial role in making the interior spaces habitable. These units help in dehumidifying, cooling, filtering, ventilating, and distributing the indoor air.

The working of a commercial air handling unit is more complicated than a residential HVAC system. These units consist of several components that play a crucial role in maintaining air quality in an industrial facility. With continued use, the parts of a commercial air handing unit wear out. They, therefore, need to be replaced regularly to maintain the quality of air. But how often do you need to replace commercial air handlers?

Change filters 3-6 times a year

Commercial air filters play a crucial role in maintaining the quality of air in a business set up. You may need to change your unit’s filters up to six times in a year, depending on whether the air handling unit is used in a controlled or harsh environment.

Commercial air handlers used in switching offices and data centers may need to be changed 3-4 times a year. This is because these filters may take long to accumulate dust and debris.

On the other hand, commercial air handlers used in harsh environments such as chemical factories, medical facilities, and military facilities may require frequent changing. Mostly, the need to replace air filters in commercial settings is determined by maintenance sensors. If the sensors indicate changes in pressure, temperature, and airflow, it’s a good time to change the filters.

Clean dampers annually

A malfunctioning damper is one of the most common problems in a commercial air handling unit. If the damper malfunctions, it can cause significant changes in the indoor air quality as well as increasing electricity bills. The primary function of the damper is to regulate the activity of a compressor. For optimum functioning, dampers should be cleaned and adjusted annually.

Inspect moving parts two times a year

A commercial air handling unit has several moving parts which include the bearings, fan, and the belts. Although these components do not have a direct impact on the indoor air quality, they should be inspected semi-annually as part of a preventive maintenance plan.

Fixing air leaks in the cabinet and supply duct annually

A routine annual checkup should include replacement of screws, search for air leaks and replacement of gaskets. Maintaining the integrity of the supply duct ensures that air does not leak out of cracks that may be in the supply duct.

Do you want a commercial air handling unit expert to take a look at your unit? Contact us today at 408-295-2182 to schedule for your unit’s replacement or servicing.

What Do You Need to Know About an HVAC Air Handler?

The air handler is the part of the HVAC system that circulates the conditioned air throughout the home or office. Whether you’re warming or cooling your house, the handler distributes whatever air you need to make your home’s temperature comfortable to live in. It comprises coils, blower motor, and many electronic components that enable it to deliver the air through your ductwork system. The air passes through an air filter, installed with the handler, to catch allergens and other particles before the handler sends the warm or cool air out.

Usually, they’re part of a split system, where one part is installed outside and the other one, the handler, is on the inside. The two components work together to distribute either heat or cool air to each room of your home, depending on what’s required for the season. The handler pulls in air, which will pass over the coils to be heated or cooled and then it’s pushed out by the blower to move through the ductwork into the rest of your home.

What do you need to know about air handlers?

It works efficiently when it’s combined with parts designed for that system. Older heating or cooling units matched with a newer air handler won’t run as smoothly and could cause a significant amount of energy loss. It could also instigate costly damages to both parts because they each have different energy outputs. If one is much older than the other, it might not be compatible with the new technology installed in the newer part.

It’s possible to install just the air handler when repairs are no longer effective, but it’s not a good idea if it’s an older heating/cooling unit. Manufacturers recommend that you replace an entire system, even if only the air handler needs replacing. Some reasons for this are:

  • Saves money on your energy bill
  • Extends the life of your new system
  • Allows you to get a newer warranty for your HVAC unit

If you find that your older air handler or outside appliance needs replacing, save yourself time and money down the road and purchase a whole new system instead. Two mismatched parts will cause issues later on that will end the life of your heating and cooling system much quicker than it should. For more information, call us at 408-295-2182. We can help you choose a system for your home, or answer any questions you may have regarding your HVAC system.

What Does An HVAC Air Handler Do?

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) air handler is a machine that regulates and circulates air. Air handlers are typically constructed as a big metal box that is made up of heating or cooling elements, a blower, sound attenuators, filter racks/chambers, and dampers. Air handlers are usually connected to a ductwork ventilation system that works to distribute the cooled or conditioned air throughout the home and then returns the air to the air handling unit.

Smaller air handlers are also available on the market and are typically referred to as terminal units. Terminal air units usually include a coil, air filter, and a blower. Air handlers that are larger in size typically condition only air from the outdoors (i.e., no recirculated air). These larger air handler units are makeup air units. There are also air handler units that are constructed for outdoor use (e.g., on the roof of a building) and they are referred to as rooftop units or packaged units.

Components of HVAC Air Handlers

Air handlers have several components as mentioned prior, including:

  • Air filter
  • Blower
  • Coils

The air filter within the air handler is located between the fan and the intake vent in order to ensure that the air brought into the HVAC system is filtered (i.e., purified) prior to being cooled and conditioned. The blower within an air handler is a fan that moves all of the cold air into the home or structure through the ventilation duct system. The coils that are inside the air handler are extremely important, as they are the piece of the machinery that conditions and cools the air within the home.

The coils work through a system that involves refrigerant being pumped inside the air handler. Afterward, a valve located inside the handler converts the refrigerant to low pressure and low-temperature gas that is then pumped inside the coils. The coils then work to condition and cool the air that is moving over the coils and the ventilation duct system. This cycle is repeated each time your house needs to cool and reach the desired temperature.

If you would like more information regarding HVAC air handlers or HVAC in general, please contact us at 408-295-2182.

How Air Handlers Actually “Handle” Air in Your AC System

What do air handlers do for your air conditioning system? It, quite simply, handles the air. What does this entail? Most air conditioning units, especially in Silicon Valley, are “split” units. This means that they have units both outdoors and indoors. The air handler covers the indoor section of the air conditioning system which is extremely vital.

The role of the handler is to distribute the air through the entire house. The handler unit for indoor air is made of an air coil, blower and filter. The handler brings air in, flows it through the coils (to heat or cool) and then expels it back into the house with the duct system. It is the portion of the AC system that makes sure the air that gets treated flows throughout the entire home.

Air Handler Parts

  • Blower The fan blower will “blow” the rest of the cooled air back throughout the home by using the duct ventilation system.
  • Air filter This filter is placed between the fan and the intake vent to make sure that the air brought into the unit is filtered before it gets cooled.
  • Coils The coils are what truly cool the air inside the house. This occurs when the housed refrigerant within the external unit is drawn out as a high-pressure and high-temperature gas into the internal air handler. A valve then transforms this gas refrigerant into a low-pressure and low-temperature gas that’s brought to the coils. These coils then make the air cooler that’s getting passed over the coils and into the system of ducts. This “used” refrigerant is brought back outside to the external system to start the cycle once again. In the majority of homes in Silicon Valley, the coils can get hotter as well to provide the “heating” portion of a home’s HVAC system.

Would it be helpful for you to use an air handler?

When you use a split-system heat pump or air conditioner, then yes, you would want to use an air handler. The air handler will make sure the air involved in the cooling or heating process is circulating. It’s the indoor component that handles air in conjunction with the outdoor part.

The evaporator coil will bring the heat out from the building to then blow the cooled air through a set of ducts in the building that are connected with the air handler. Call O.C. McDonald’s 24-hour live operator for more information on any questions about your HVAC system and schedule your appointment today at 408-295-2182.

How Does an Industrial Air Handler Work?

The industrial air handler is an integral part of most industrial HVAC systems. Also known as an air handling unit, this device is responsible for the circulation and regulation of air through the HVAC system. Particularly because of its importance to the overall system, you may be curious about how your HVAC system’s air handler works. Before getting to know the process, it can be helpful for you to learn the terminology and types of air handlers so that you can better understand the unit that you use in your facility.

Your facility’s HVAC system most likely has a large outdoor air handling unit. These are commonly referred to as packaged units (PUs) or, when located on the roof, rooftop units (RTUs). Both of these are also called makeup air units (MAUs), as they only condition air from outside the facility rather than recirculating the air from inside. Air handlers that recirculate indoor air are known as terminal units. These are generally smaller and are only used in localized areas.

The Air Conditioning Process

The easiest way to explore how your air handler works is by examining the route that air takes through the various components of the whole unit. For most larger systems, this process is as follows:

  • Return fans bring air in from the return duct through air filters to prevent dust and other impurities from traveling through the system.
  • Heating and cooling elements, which may involve direct or indirect heat exchange methods, then condition the air to the desired temperature.
  • A humidifier may be present in colder areas to help prevent heating units from drying the air too much during the conditioning process.
  • In temperate climates, air is often moved to a mixing chamber, where return and exhaust air may be mixed to more accurately reach the desired temperature.
  • Supply fans will then blow the air back into the facility through the supply duct.

 

Not all industrial air handlers are made the same. Depending on the size, type, and other factors of your facility’s air handling unit, you may notice different or additional components. You can always talk to an expert if you have additional questions about the inner workings of your industrial air handling unit.

If you’re interested in more information or a free consultation at your facility, contact O.C. McDonald Company today at (408) 295-2182